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Foreign countries and continents have stuff that defies my knowledgement like their kid shows.
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And yet... It's what makes them so interesting.

TL;DR A young, old-fogey rants how kids shows were better back in his day, because new things suck.

I remember Bananas in Pajamas... and now I feel old. Upon Googling to see when it first aired, they apparently made a 3D animated version.

Even though I took 3D animation in school... I still hate the thought that they tried to make it 3D animated. Not just because it looks as basic as an animation student's project, but the fact that companies are phasing out classic and different forms of entertainment for the quick and easy new ones. Same thing happened with Disney ditching hand drawn animation because their 3D ones were doing better. So I guess part of it is following what the market wants.

I guess full bodied character costumes were probably the new craze at that time that companies latched onto (BiJ, Sesame Street, Barney, Teletubbies) to pause out their classic forms. Just like they're doing now with 3D... But I don't think we'll really get those old forms back. As far as I'm aware, it's far easier and likely cost effective to throw one studio money and pay for voice actors then get a prop studio, costumes, a set, actual actors, scheduling it all, etc.

So unless someone can make something simple like Puppet Pal Clem a hit show, we're stuck with 3D. It's not a TV example, but Minecraft transcended it's ugly design (maybe kids like it) because of what was underneath (in the case of a show, it would be interesting characters/story).

2D is probably safe for a while with cartoons though, since it's easier/cheaper to draw than create a rig, lighting, etc. Plus there's still 2D shows doing well, unlike live-action shows whether it was with people (Sharon, Lois, and Bram), or costumes (Barney), or hand puppet shows (can't recall one... Nanalan? That's all I got).

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Joined: August 2013
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