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Dragon Quest VII almost wasn't localized, but fan requests changed Square-Enix's mind

During the Treehouse Live stream from E3 2016, Square-Enix revealed that they originally had no plans to localize Dragon Quest VII. This was due to the large amount of text in the game, which would take an insane amount of work. This decision was turned around when Square-Enix heard the fan outpouring for the game to be localized. In specific, fan letters and a petition were noted as the reasons why the decision was made to localize.

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There's a difference between an organized, peaceful movement that does things in a nice orderly fashion (like the DQ movement) and a chaotic, spamming, irritating movement (Like the whole "Torrential Downpour" movement due to the lack of any organization causing it to get hijacked with no clear direction making it much worse than it could have been if it was more organized.) Letting your voice heard is one thing, but spamming or mindless screaming doesn't make you look good when doing it, which is what the majority of these campaigns end up doing. Thankfully, the DQ one didn't end up that way, having been observing it from the beginning, and I think the end results show.

People saying that complaining never amounts to anything... look who got served. I hope I never hear people say that consumer movements don't have any effect ever again.

There's a difference between an organized, peaceful movement that does things in a nice orderly fashion (like the DQ movement) and a chaotic, spamming, irritating movement (Like the whole "Torrential Downpour" movement due to the lack of any organization causing it to get hijacked with no clear direction making it much worse than it could have been if it was more organized.) Letting your voice heard is one thing, but spamming or mindless screaming doesn't make you look good when doing it, which is what the majority of these campaigns end up doing. Thankfully, the DQ one didn't end up that way, having been observing it from the beginning, and I think the end results show.

Don't forget someone on the "Torrential Downpour" side had the effing gall to try and bring Iwata into that situation by claiming that NoA probably wouldn't be making alterations if he was still alive.

1) Don't bring the recently deceased into crap like this, I remember when an "SJW type" of person did that same thing back in 2014 by using his recently deceased friend JewWario (a well respected internet personality who sadly committed suicide in early 2014) to push an agenda.

2) I bet you if anything a lot of these localization changes were thought up at NoA even before Iwata passed away.

And don't forget the lovely "It's NOT a boycott"/"It IS a boycott" statements different members make, once again proving that it has no real direction set in place. Heck, someone even used the hashtag to stir up fake controversy over Persona 5's Box art edit, (to prevent the rating box from obscuring a character's face, which most sane people knew wasn't a big deal but someone pretty much slapped the TD tag on it and made the movement's reputation even worse). Seriously, I thought OperationFaceplateNA was a poorly organized mess with some folks rudely spamming on tweets/facebook posts Nintendo's "Let's Super Mario" charity, but this whole Localization mess is much more depressing due to how poorly organized it is and how I can't go one tweet related to a RPG on Nintendo's social media channels without someone screaming Censorship. I'm on the verge of making a whole parody video on this whole ordeal because of it.

It just depends on whether or not the company in question listens. Square Enix is one of the few that does. Nintendo, for example, as said that they pretty much ignore those consumer movements.

june the wolf
Wed Jun 15 16 05:14pm
Rating: 1

GREAT JOB FANS!!! now if they would only listen to other requests....

(looking at the world ends with you 2, final fantasy 5 and 6 remakes for 3ds.....)

Guess we gotta keep the word out from now on.

This was due to the large amount of text in the game, which would take an insane amount of work.

Ah, the laziness excuse. You know what would take longer than translating a huge amount of text? Writing it all in the first place. T_T

You know what else would be a lot of work? Writing out Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace by hand.

His wife did that eight times.
http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/5-things-you-may-not-know-about-leo-tolstoy

It's not so much an issue of laziness but an issue of return on investment

There's more to business than money. There's fan bases, the environment, the local community, worker morale, brand-building, gummy bears, etc.

Also, the summary didn't say "This was due to them being uncertain whether they would make a return on their investment" but rather "This was due to the large amount of text in the game, which would take an insane amount of work."

Did I also mention she often copied it by candlelight?

There was a reason I didn't explicitly mention money. It's because I'm talking about return as a whole, and not just financial return.

And when they say it takes a lot of work, I really doubt they meant it as "we initially couldn't be arsed". It wasn't until they saw there'd be a reasonable return (thanks to the letters and petition) they thought it'd be worth the investment.

Fred Duck said:
There's more to business than money. There's fan bases, the environment, the local community, worker morale, brand-building, gummy bears, etc.

Let me expand on this.

This was something I've mentioned before about how Nintendo of America stopped caring about the Wii in 2010, two entire years before Wii U came out.

It looked really bad when Nintendo stopped supporting their own system. I mean, it was pretty ugly when every other Nintendo branch in the world published Xenoblade Chronicles, The Last Story, and Pandora's Tower. this parties had to step in in two of those cases and GameStop had to pony up money for the third! They let fully-translated games like Project Zero 2: Wii Edition, Inazuma Eleven Strikers, Another Code: R - A Journey into Lost Memories, and Disaster: Day of Crisis languish in Europe. Sure, four games aren't going to prop up a system (see: Wii U) but the point is, it looked like NoA wasn't even trying. The justification given was "they're not system sellers." Big deal. VERY few games have such broad mass-market appeal that they make huge numbers of people rush out and buy entire systems just to play that one game. However, for people who love footie, for example, an Inazuma Eleven game might be enough. Some long time Nintendo fans began to feel nervous or abandoned, or just left once NoA gave them the cold shoulder. When you launch a new product, it's FAR easier to get previous customers to buy than entirely new customers. (This is how I got suckered into buying one.)

That's the fan base. It's something to be cultivated. Here, SE has admitted that they're listening to the fan base. So, you can see this turn of events as one of two things:

1) SE really didn't feel like localizing the game but 30,000,000 people petitioned and they expect 10% of them to actually buy the game, making it profitable. (Note: companies these days never feel that "breaking even" is good enough, even though that can have very useful, tangible benefits like showing support for your system or increasing your fan base and customer pool.)

2) This is a PR smokescreen where SE was playing coy in order to make fans feel more invested in the game, akin to the lie about Fire Emblem Awakening being potentially the last in its series.

Not only that but the release schedule is super-light and there's a pretty hefty install base.

Local community, worker morale...eh...

Brand-building. Dragon Quest XI: Sugi Sarishi Toki o Motomete is on the horizon, and I imagine that's got a shot at being localized. What better way to drum up interest than to release Dragon Quest VII: Fragments of the Forgotten Past? Perhaps they'll follow that up with Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King.

Anyone who says "we have to make a huge profit on every single game" deserves to lose their job.

Gummy bears: I like the soft, chewy ones best.

Did you ever read War and Peace? You should try it someday.

I'm not sure I get your point here. Is it meant to counter mine? Because to me it seems more an elaboration of what I said as well...

It's okay. Have some gummy bears.

More work cost more money...
In fact translators are paid by the number of words translated (or sentences, it depend)... So the more text there is, the more it cost. So the return on the investment is important, and implied when talking about the amount of text to translate.

Hi. I replied to the big N, but you can take a look if you like. :}

I-I'm the big N? Wow! I suddenly feel very important! =D

Also important to note is that it's not just translators. There are also editors, testers, graphical artists, etc.

Awesome to hear those of us that cheered this game for years had an effect. Can't wait to pick it up!

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