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Lost Sphear dev feels today's RPGs don't leave room for imagination

Lost Sphear just came out on Switch, and it's no doubt a throwback to RPGs of previous generations. That's exactly what Atsushi Hashimoto, director of Tokyo RPG Factory, was aiming for. One of the big motivations for going old-school comes from Hashimoto's belief that today's RPGs take away the imagination of the player. He shares this thought in an interview with Verge.

“I believe one of the appealing points of RPGs from the ‘90s is that they left room for the imagination. I feel that this element may be fading away nowadays because graphics in games are now able to depict things in such detail. When we develop our games [at Tokyo RPG Factory], we take great care to leave room for the imagination and we want people to experience that, even with a modern game.”

I can definitely see where Hashimoto is coming from. A lot of the imagination of older games has been replaced by the fidelity and horsepower of today's platforms. It's not a bad or good thing. It's more of a personal preference for players.

Categories: Interviews, Consoles

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Top Rated Comment

I can understand leaving some room to the imagination of the players. That's part of what made SNES RPGs so special.

But jeez, Lost Sphear is a blank slate. That demo was bland af.

I think the Octopath Traveler is a good example of a game that leaves room to the imagination while delivering plenty of charm and personality. It feels very inspired, I can't say the same for Lost Sphear.

I can understand leaving some room to the imagination of the players. That's part of what made SNES RPGs so special.

But jeez, Lost Sphear is a blank slate. That demo was bland af.

I think the Octopath Traveler is a good example of a game that leaves room to the imagination while delivering plenty of charm and personality. It feels very inspired, I can't say the same for Lost Sphear.

I wholeheartedly disagree with this. I don’t feel anything should be left to the imagination when possible, unless it’s the story. If it’s visually left to the imagination, it should be because of hardware limitation. Nevertheless, this can also depend on art direction. Project Octopath looks like a beautifully pixelated game with great levels of detail. Lost Sphear look like it left too much to the imagination, leaving it a bit sparse & bland. I have “I am Setsuna” & will be passing on Lost Sphear”. If your game is a fantasy game, I’m okay with the ideas pushing the boundaries of reality. If you(developer) can imagine it, & it works, put it in there. That’s why I play video games & not board games.

What about Pokemon?

hinph
Tue Jan 30 18 03:37pm
Rating: 1 (Updated 1 time)

This is why I feel like a game like Final Fantasy VII doesn't need to be entirely remade... if they wanted to go back and give it a remake treatment to add polish like they did with III and IV, cool, but an entire remake in Unreal Engine 4 with a completely different battle system? Haha, that game is going to disappoint so many people. Square-Enix is in a no-win situation there. People are going to bitch, bitch, bitch no matter what they do. Mark my words... it'll probably make them a lot of money, however, and I guess that's the ultimate objective.

Yeah, I don't like the idea of remaking FF7 with an all new battle mechanic, either. I think Square Enix should remake with a modified version of the Project Octopath engine. I think Square Enix would do well to re-release some classic games in the style of Octopath like the 16 bit Final Fantasy games and Chrono Trigger.

I already stated this on various posts, remake Chrono Trigger, FF4-5-6, Mana games, DQ with Project Octopath engine & style or even better, make a new Chrono Trigger 3 with this engine!!!
It would sell like hotcakes X 100000000!!!

donzaloog
Thu Feb 01 18 07:09am
Rating: 1

It would sell like chocolate flavoured crack.

gamegod
Thu Feb 01 18 02:06pm
Rating: 1

Even more than chocolate flavored crack, like chocolate flavored crack on naked girls!!!

This sounds illegal. I am calling the police, guys

It sounds illegal... sounds is the key word, but when you look at it, it actually does not look illegal ;P

thewp
Tue Jan 30 18 03:50pm
Rating: 2

Not sure Lost Sphear is the way to do it, but I agree overall. Square claimed for a long time they couldn't make a game as varied, visually distinct, and long as FF7 nowadays. Since everything is so hi-def and polished, they need to reuse assets when they can, which makes different areas look too same-y. I see this with newer Tales games as well - less unique areas and more maps with a bunch of similar looking corridors. If it means taking a slight hit to graphics, I would rather have memorable distinct areas than a bunch of stuff that looks the same.

I'm looking at something like the original Xenoblade Chronicles when I think of games with incredibly memorable, distinct areas that left an impact on me

So I am not alone thinking lost sphear look terribly bland and boring... the demo was torture and I usualy love old school jrpgs. Even if they sold it for 5$ I really doubt I would buy it.Project Octopath traveller looks and feel a thousand times better.

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