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Nintendo takes down fan-made Super Mario Bros. Commodore 64 port

Come on, Nintendo...

We all knew it would happen, no matter how much we didn't want it to. The other day, we shared footage of a fan-made Commodore 64 port of Super Mario Bros.. The port was 7 years in the work, and the end result was absolutely staggering. Fans flocked to the game to check it out...as did Nintendo.

Nintendo deemed the port a threat, and decided to hit the developer and other hosting sites with takedown notices. The game's download has now been scrubbed from most sites, but footage still remains. You really have to wonder why Nintendo thought a port of Super Mario Bros. to a largely-defunct platform was something that had to be stomped out.

Categories: Top Stories, Consoles
Tags: nes, mario

Comments

Top Rated Comment
sack
Tue Apr 23 19 05:23pm
Rating: 4

Absolutely. It has to be a standard that legal teams adhere to anything that applied. If you leave some things as ok and others as not ok, it complicates the perception of what is and isn’t allowed, and becomes a lot messier. Definitely non-threatening, but it still falls under that umbrella. :/

You really have to wonder why Nintendo thought a port of Super Mario Bros. to a largely-defunct platform was something that had to be stomped out.

They didn’t see it as any threat whatsoever but leaving it uncontested sets a precedent.

sack
Tue Apr 23 19 05:23pm
Rating: 4

Absolutely. It has to be a standard that legal teams adhere to anything that applied. If you leave some things as ok and others as not ok, it complicates the perception of what is and isn’t allowed, and becomes a lot messier. Definitely non-threatening, but it still falls under that umbrella. :/

Exactly, it would be same as someone making a CDi sequel to Wand of Gamelon.

Remember Giana sisters?

And that doesn't use the Mario IP whatsoever.

Think about Wonder boy here...

I can't believe that RMC would be OK with this. It's called protecting your property and IP which in today's world (I'm looking at you, China) is more important than ever.

Truer words have never been spoken!

the rules are pretty clear ip owners can lose their rights if they don't defend it enough.
that's why Lego asks their consumers to call their toys lego bricks and not legos

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