Login

Industry-wide component shortage forces Nintendo to battle other tech companies to secure Switch parts

- Nintendo has told suppliers and assemblers it hopes to make nearly 20 million Switch units by the end of this fiscal year
- there's an industry-wide capacity shortage for components used in smartphones, computer servers and other tech
- this includes NAND flash-memory chips that store data, liquid-crystal displays and the motors that enable HD Rumble
- rapid expansion of web-based services for corporations has driven demand for computer servers that use flash memor
- continued demand for Apple’s iPhone line will also put a strain on components
- makers of data-center servers tend to use newer and higher-margin components
- smartphone makers issue larger orders
- this makes it hard for Nintendo to secure components they need
- if Nintendo increased spending significantly to secure more parts, that could risk driving the Switch’s production cost up
- Nintendo may again consider air cargo shipping toward the end of the year, some sources said

Categories: Top Stories, Consoles
Tags: switch

Comments

Top Rated Comment
kuro
Tue May 30 17 08:28am
Rating: 13 (Updated 1 time)

I believe the NES mini also use NAND as well. This was probably one of the reasons why they had to discontinue it. They had to prioritize Switch and get the parts it needed.

kuro
Tue May 30 17 08:28am
Rating: 13 (Updated 1 time)

I believe the NES mini also use NAND as well. This was probably one of the reasons why they had to discontinue it. They had to prioritize Switch and get the parts it needed.

entity
Tue May 30 17 08:38am
Rating: 1

No, no, no. This is just Nintendo making fake shortage of their systems. Get with the times, Kuro.

But really now. It amazes me that people somehow thought Ninty woulf not proritize the Switch before the NES Mini. I know it's fun to be anri-Nintendo, but at least use logic in the argument. You do make a very valid point. It's obvious that they want the NS to succeed and had to sacrifice othet departments.

Just hope they keep the hype up and sell all they can. It's nice to have all three battleing it out again.

gamblor
Tue May 30 17 09:24am
Rating: 3

*Cut to Reggie sitting on a giant five story throne made out of NAND memory chips and NES minis*

"No," he whispers to himself.

I was wondering that, too, Kuro.

I always find this kind of news somber. I have to wonder if we'll look back at this era as being sort of 'the golden age of electronics' where we could buy new gadgets every year and not have to worry about where our materials were sourced from.

Part shortages are actually common in the electronics industry. It was part of the reason why Nintendo couldn't satisfy Wii demand back in the day.

I've been of the opinion that they should consolidate the Joy-Con L and R into a singular ambidextrous model somehow. I wonder if that would help ease production worries by not having to pump out two separate batches.

Wouldn't change a thing. In fact, it would exacerbate them, because one of them, as they are right now, use less components... If both were the same, they would both need a NFC chip and IR sensor... And that's without even considering the headache it would be to design them so they are comfortable and useable no matter what side you attach them to, and how the hell the console is supposed to know which one is supposed to be the Right one and the Left one...

The problem here happens for two main reason: there is a limit of chips and screens that can be made because there is a limited amount of factory and workers, and there is also a limited amount of ressources. Chips use a lot or rare elements, gold being one of the less rare one (!!). Even the liquid crystals used in the screens have a limited accessibility.

Nintendo with production problems? Never seen this before.

Yes, I know, this time it might actually not be their fault, but it's still stick to their bad production trends.

Want to join this discussion?

You should like, totally log in or sign up!